Search
  • George Young

Time For a Change of Scene

In September of 2017, 35 years after I appeared on-camera dancing in a music video, I retired officially from production work. I did work for three years after the PG&E dust-up in 2014, but I cannot remember one remarkable thing about any of the jobs, though there were a lot of them.


There are a lot of people to thank. Suzy Miller, who gave me my first behind the camera job. Bill Cote. Cory Anderson. Richie Zeifman. Phil Lofaro. Steve Dauterman. Jonathan Zurer. Dan Ogawa. Joyce Quan. Petra Janopaul. Dan Smith. Scott Ewers. Janine Lane. Andy Rasdal. David Bacigalupi. Jane Hernandez. Patricia Dorfman. Jill Byron. Jack Gallagher. Jodie Marko. Michelle Donnelly. Bob Gondell. Larry Lauter. Cheryl Rosenthal. Jef Loeb. Lou Cubillos. Cat Chatham. Chris Whelan. Sinead O’Mara. Andrew Bender. Phil Paternite. Richard Camp, Jeff Apps, Edy Enriquez, Eric Foster.

But especially, Lee Rauch, my wife of 30 plus years. She hasn’t been perfect, but she’s been awful darned close.


This is not a comprehensive list of all the wonderful people with whom I’ve had the good fortune to intersect professional lives.


This diary of my professional life goes counter to that adage, “In the end, you will only remember the love and the people.” That’s not true. I still have dreams of flying actors in body armor, gawking at George Lucas, and watching a Mister Softee Ice Cream Truck leap Green Street in the Nob Hill neighborhood of San Francisco.


And I don’t wake up screaming.


I cannot imagine a more rewarding and fulfilling career than the 35 years I spent directing the crew, staff, agency, clients, directors, and actors to the motorhome and fielding complaints about the four-star cuisine I provided to a bunch of people too cheap to go to McDonald’s on their days off.


Anyone genuinely interested in working in production, note that it does not take any special training or talent. All you have to do is work hard, show up on time, and do the best you can every hour of every day you are on a job.


If you are fortunate enough to be able to turn around some day and look back at a series of relationships and jobs that just don’t exist anywhere else except in the odd world of production, consider yourself one of the lucky and truly blessed.


I do.


NOT THE END

TIME FOR A NEW BEGINNING


40 views

© 2018 by George W Young